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Pete Zaitcev

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Azure Sphere [23 Apr 2018|01:37pm]

Oh Microsoft, you card:

[Azure Sphere OS] combines security innovations pioneered in Windows, a security monitor, and a custom Linux kernel [...]</p>

Kinda like Oracle shipping "Unbreakable Linux". Still in the "embrace" phase.

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Suddenly Liferea tonight [16 Apr 2018|10:09am]

Liferea irritated me for many years with a strange behavior when dragging a subscription. You mouse down on the feed, it becomes selected — so far so good. Then you drag it somewhere — possibly far off screen, making the view scroll — then drop it. Drops fine, updates the DB, model, and the view fine. But! The selection then jumps to a completely random feed somewhere.

Well, it's not actually random. What happens instead, the GtkTreeView implements DnD by removing a row, then re-inserting it. When a selected row is removed, obviously the selection has to disappear, but instead it's set to the next row after the removed one. I suppose I may be uniquely vulnerable to this because I have 300+ feeds and I drag them around all the time. If Liferea weren't kind enough to remember the preferred order, this would not matter so much.

I meant to fix this for a long time, but somehow a wrong information got stuck in my head: I thought that Liferea was written in C++, so it took years to gather the motivation. Imagine my surprise when I found plain old C. I spent a good chunk of Sunday figuring out GTK's tree view thingie, but in the end it was quite simple.

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With Blockchain Technology [06 Apr 2018|12:19am]

Recently it became common to see a mocking of startup founders that add "blockchain" to something, then sell it to gullible VCs and reap the green harvest. Apparently it has become quite a thing. But now they went a step further.

The other day I was watching some anime at Crunchyroll, when a commercial came up. It pitched a fantasy sports site "with blockchain technology" and smart contracts. The remarkable part about it is, it wasn't aimed at investors. It was a consumer advertisement. Its creators apparently expect members of the public — who play fantasy sports, no less — to know that blockchain exists and think about it in positive terms.

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Jim Whitehurst on OpenStack in 2018 [04 Apr 2018|11:44am]

Remarks of our CEO, as captured in an interview by TechCrunch:

The other major open-source project Red Hat is betting on is OpenStack . That may come as a bit of a surprise, given that popular opinion in the last year or so has shifted against the massive project that wants to give enterprises an open source on-premise alternative to AWS and other cloud providers. “There was a sense among big enterprise tech companies that OpenStack was going to be their savior from Amazon,” Whitehurst said. “But even OpenStack, flawlessly executed, put you where Amazon was five years ago. If you’re Cisco or HP or any of those big OEMs, you’ll say that OpenStack was a disappointment. But from our view as a software company, we are seeing good traction.”

He's over-simplifying things for the constraints of an interview: the last sencence needs unpacking. Why do you think that "traction" happens? Because OpenStack gives its users something that Amazon does not. For example, Swift isn't trying to match features of S3. Attempting to do that would cause the exact lag he's referring. Instead, Swift works to solve the problem of people who want to own their own data in general. So, it's mostly about the implementation: how to make it scalable, inexpensive, etc. And, of course, keeing it open source, preserving user's freedom to modify. This is why often you see people installing a truncated OpenStack that only has Swift. I'm sure this applies to other parts of OpenStack, in particular the SDN/NFV.

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Wayland versus Glib in Liferea on F27 [02 Apr 2018|12:59pm]

I decided to build Liferea over the weekend, and the build crashes at the introspection phase.

Apparently, GTK+ programs are set up to introspect themselves: basically the binary can look at its own types or whatnot, then output the result. I'm not quite clear what the purpose of that is, the online docs imply that it's for API documentation mostly. Anyhow, the build runs the liferea binary itself, with arguments that make it run the introspection, then this happens:

(gdb) where
#0  0x00007fa90a2a93b0 in wl_list_insert_list ()
    at /lib64/libwayland-server.so.0
#1  0x00007fa90a2a4e6f in wl_priv_signal_emit ()
    at /lib64/libwayland-server.so.0
#2  0x00007fa90a2a5477 in wl_display_destroy ()
    at /lib64/libwayland-server.so.0
#3  0x00007fa916d163d9 in \
  WebCore::PlatformDisplayWayland::~PlatformDisplayWayland() () at \
  /lib64/libwebkit2gtk-4.0.so.37
#4  0x00007fa916d163e9 in \
  WebCore::PlatformDisplayWayland::~PlatformDisplayWayland() () at \
  /lib64/libwebkit2gtk-4.0.so.37
#5  0x00007fa91100cb58 in __run_exit_handlers () at /lib64/libc.so.6
#6  0x00007fa91100cbaa in  () at /lib64/libc.so.6
#7  0x00007fa911e9d367 in  () at /lib64/libgirepository-1.0.so.1
#8  0x00007fa91197d188 in parse_arg.isra () at /lib64/libglib-2.0.so.0
#9  0x00007fa91197d8ca in parse_long_option () at /lib64/libglib-2.0.so.0
#10 0x00007fa91197f2d6 in g_option_context_parse () at \
  /lib64/libglib-2.0.so.0
#11 0x00007fa91197fd84 in g_option_context_parse_strv ()
    at /lib64/libglib-2.0.so.0
#12 0x00007fa912164558 in g_application_real_local_command_line ()
    at /lib64/libgio-2.0.so.0
#13 0x00007fa912164bf6 in g_application_run () at /lib64/libgio-2.0.so.0
#14 0x000000000041b9ff in main (argc=2, argv=0x7fff2e1203d8) at main.c:77

As much as I can tell, despite being asked only to do the introspection, Liferea (unknowingly, through GTK+) pokes Wayland, which sets exit handlers. However, Wayland is never used (introspection, duh), and not initialized completely, so when its exit handlers run, it crashes.

Well, now what?

I supplse the cleanest approach might be to modify Glib so it avoids provoking Wayland when merely introspecting. But honestly I have no clue about desktop apps and do not know where to even start looking.

UPDATE: Much thanks to Branko Grubic, who pointed me to a bug in WebKit. Currently building with this as a workaround:

--- a/src/Makefile.am
+++ b/src/Makefile.am
@@ -82,6 +82,7 @@ INTROSPECTION_GIRS = Liferea-3.0.gir
 
 Liferea-3.0.gir: liferea$(EXEEXT)
 INTROSPECTION_SCANNER_ARGS = -I$(top_srcdir)/src --warn-all -......
+INTROSPECTION_SCANNER_ENV = WEBKIT_DISABLE_COMPOSITING_MODE=1
 Liferea_3_0_gir_NAMESPACE = Liferea
 Liferea_3_0_gir_VERSION = 3.0
 Liferea_3_0_gir_PROGRAM = $(builddir)/liferea$(EXEEXT)

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The more you tighten your grip [15 Mar 2018|05:33pm]

Seen at the webpage for RancherOS:

Everything in RancherOS is a Docker container. We accomplish this by launching two instances of Docker. One is what we call System Docker, the first process on the system. All other system services, like ntpd, syslog, and console, are running in Docker containers. System Docker replaces traditional init systems like systemd, and can be used to launch additional system services.

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You Are Not Uber: Only Uber Are Uber [13 Mar 2018|10:45am]

Remember how FAA shut down the business of NavWorx, with heavy monetary and loss-of-use consequences for its customers? Imagine receiving a letter from U.S. Government telling you that your car is not compatible with roads, and therefore you are prohibited from continuing to drive it. Someone sure forgot that the power to regulate is the power to destroy. This week, we have this report by IEEE Spectrum:

IEEE Spectrum can reveal that the SpaceBees are almost certainly the first spacecraft from a Silicon Valley startup called Swarm Technologies, currently still in stealth mode. Swarm was founded in 2016 by one engineer who developed a spacecraft concept for Google and another who sold his previous company to Apple. The SpaceBees were built as technology demonstrators for a new space-based Internet of Things communications network.

The only problem is, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) had dismissed Swarm’s application for its experimental satellites a month earlier, on safety grounds.

On Wednesday, the FCC sent Swarm a letter revoking its authorization for a follow-up mission with four more satellites, due to launch next month. A pending application for a large market trial of Swarm’s system with two Fortune 100 companies could also be in jeopardy.

Swarm Technologies, based in Menlo Park, Calif., is the brainchild of two talented young aerospace engineers. Sara Spangelo, its CEO, is a Canadian who worked at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, before moving to Google in 2016. Spangelo’s astronaut candidate profile at the Canadian Space Agency says that while at Google, she led a team developing a spacecraft concept for its moonshot X division, including both technical and market analyses.

Swarm CFO Benjamin Longmier has an equally impressive resume. In 2015, he sold his near-space balloon company Aether Industries to Apple, before taking a teaching post at the University of Michigan. He is also co-founder of Apollo Fusion, a company producing an innovative electric propulsion system for satellites.

Although a leading supplier in its market, NavWorx was a bit player at the government level. Not that many people have small private airplanes anymore. But Swarm operates at a different level, an may be able to grease a enough palms in the Washington, D.C., enough to survive this debacle. Or, they may reconstitute as a notionally new company, then claim a clean start. Again unlike the NavWorx, there's no installed base.

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MITM in Ireland [04 Mar 2018|01:14am]

I'm just back from OpenStack PTG (Project Technical Gathering) in Dublin, Ireland and while I was there, Firefox reported wrong TLS certificates for some obscure websites, although not others. Example: zaitcev.us retains old certificate, as does wrk.ru. But sealion.club goes bad. I presume that Irish authorities and/or ISPs deemed it proper to MITM these sites. The question is, why such a strange choice of targets?

The sealion.club is a free speech and discussion site, named, as much as I can tell, after an old (possibly classic or memetic) Wondermark cartoon. Maybe the Irish just hate the free speech.

Or, they do not MITM sites that have TLS settings that are too easy to break... and Gmail.

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ARM servers apparently exist at last [16 Feb 2018|12:42am]

Check out what I found at Pogo Linux (h/t Bryan Lunduke):

ARM R150-T62
2 x Cavium® ThunderX™ 48 Core ARM processors
16 x DDR4 DIMM slots
3 x 40GbE QSFP+ LAN ports
4 x 10GbE SFP+ LAN ports
4 x 3.5” hot-swappable HDD/SSD bays
650W 80 PLUS Platinum redundant PSU
$5,638.82

The prices are ridiculouts, but at least it's a server with CentOS.

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More system administration in the age of SystemD [14 Feb 2018|05:23pm]

I'm tinkering with OpenStack TripleO in a simulated environment. It uses a dedicated non-privileged user, "stack", which can do things such as list VMs with "virsh list". So, yesterday I stopped the undercloud VM, and went to sleep. Today, I want to restart it... but virsh says:

error: failed to connect to the hypervisor
error: Cannot create user runtime directory '/run/user/1000/libvirt': Permission denied

What seems to happen is that when one logs into the stack@ user over ssh, systemd-logind mounts that /run/user/UID thing, but if I log as zaitcev@ and then do "su - stack", this fails to occur.

I have no idea what to do about this. It's probably trivial for someone more knowledgeable to throw the right pam_systemd line into /etc/pam.d/su. But su-l includes system-auth, which invokes pam_systemd.so, and yet... Oh well.

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Farewell Nexus 7, Hello Huawei M3 [03 Feb 2018|11:17pm]

Flying a photoshoot of the Carlson, I stuffed my Nexus 7 under my thighs and cracked the screen. In my defense, I did it several times before, because I hate leaving it on the cockpit floor. I had to fly uncoordinated for the photoshoot, which causes anything that's not fixed in place slide around, and I'm paranoid about a controls interference. Anyway, the cracked screen caused a significant dead zone where touch didn't register anymore, and that made the tablet useless. I had to replace it.

In the years since I had the Nexus (apparently since 2014), the industry stopped making good 7-inch tablets. Well, you can still buy $100 tablets in that size. But because the Garmin Pilot was getting spec-hungry recently, I had no choice but to step up. Sad, really. Naturally, I'm having trouble fitting the M3 into pockets where Nexus lived comfortably before. {It's a full-size iPad in the picture, not a Mini.}

The most annoying problem that I encountered was Chrome not liking the SSL certificate of www.zaitcev.us. It bails with ERR_SSL_SERVER_CERT_BAD_FORMAT. I have my own fake CA, so I install my CA certificate on clients and I sign my hosts. I accept the consequences and inconventice. The annoyance arises because Chrome does not tell what it does not like about the certificate. Firefox works fine with it, as do other applications (like IMAP clients). Chrome in the Nexus worked fine. A cursory web search suggests that Chrome may want alternative names keyed with "DNS.1" instead of "DNS". Dunno what it means and if it is true.

UPDATE: "Top FBI, CIA, and NSA officials all agree: Stay away from Huawei phones"

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400 gigabits, every second [23 Jan 2018|01:43pm]

I keep waiting for RJ-45 to fail to keep the pace with the gigabits, for many years. And it always catches up. But maybe not anymore. Here's what the connector looks for QSFP-DD, a standard module connector for 400GbE:

Two rows, baby, same as on USB3.

These speeds are mostly used between leaf and spine switches, but I'm sure we'll see them in the upstream routers, too.

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NUC versus laptop [20 Jan 2018|11:03am]

When I split off the router, I received a bit of a breather from the Fedora killing i686, because I do not have to upgrade the non-routing server as faithfully as an Internet-facing firewall. Still, eventually I must switch from the ASUS EEEPC to something viable.

So, I considered a NUC, just like the one that Richard W.M. Jones bought. It beats an old laptop in every way. In particular, it's increasingly difficult to disassemble laptops nowadays, and the candidate I have now has is hard drive buried in a particularly vexing way: the whole thing must be taken apart, with a dozen of tiny connectors carefully pried off, before the disk can be extracted. Still, a laptop offers a couple of features. #1: it always has a monitor and keyboard, an #2: it comes with its own uninterruptible power supply. And the cost is already amortized.

Long term, I am inclined to believe that Atwood is right and all user-facing computers will morph into tablets. When that happens, a supply of useful laptops will dry up and I will have to resort to whatever microserver box is available.But that today is not that day.

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New toy [15 Jan 2018|03:38pm]

Guess what.

A Russian pillowcase is much wider (or squar-er) than tubular American ones, so it works perfectly as a cover.

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Old news [12 Jan 2018|10:07am]

Per U.S. News:

Alphabet Inc's (GOOG, GOOGL) Google said in 2016 that it was designing a server based on International Business Machines Corp's (IBM) Power9 processor.

Have they put anything into production since then? If not, why bring this up?

UPDATE: R. Hubbell writes by e-mail:

So yes I think the move to the IBM is due to their encounter of the exploits.

A lot of lip service is given to the hazards of the monoculture. But why PPC of all things? Is Google becoming incapable of dealing with any supplier that is not a megacorp?

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A split home network [10 Jan 2018|10:52pm]

Real quick, why a 4-port router was needed.

  1. Red: Upstream link to ISP
  2. Grey: WiFi
  3. Blue: Entertainment stack
  4. Green: General Ethernet

The only reason to split the blue network is to prevent TiVo from attacking other boxes, such as desktops and printers. Yes, this is clearly not paranoid enough for a guy who insists on a dumb TV.

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Buying a dumb TV in 2018 America [10 Jan 2018|12:29pm]

I wanted to buy a TV a month ago and found that almost all of them are "Smart" nowadays. When I asked for a conventional TV, people ranging from a floor worker at Best Buy to Nikita Danilov at Facebook implied that I was an idiot. Still, I succeeded.

At first, I started looking at what is positioned as "conference room monitor". The NEC E506 is far away the leader, but it's expensive at $800 or so.

Then, I went to Fry's, who advertise quasi-brands like SILO. They had TVs on display, but were out. I was even desperate enough to be upsold to Athyme for $450, but they fortunately were out of that one too.

At that point, I headed to Best Buy, who have an exclusive agreement with Toshiba (h/t Matt Kern on Facebook). I was not happy to support this kind of distasteful arrangement, but very few options remained. There, it was either waiting for delivery, or driving 3 hours to a warehouse store. Considering how much my Jeep burns per mile, I declined.

Finally, I headed to a local Wal-Mart and bought a VISIO for $400 out the door. No fuss, no problem, easy peasy. Should've done that from the start.

P.S. Some people suggested buying a Smart TV and then not plugging it in. It includes not giving it the password for the house WiFi. Unfortunately, it is still problematic, as some of these TVs will associate with any open wireless network by default. An attacker drives by with a passwordless AP, and roots all TVs on the block. Unfortunately, I live an high-tech area where stuff like that happens all the time. When I mentioned it to Nikita, he thought that I was an idiot for sure. It's like a Russian joke about "dropping everything and moving to Uryupinsk."

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Caches are like the government [08 Jan 2018|04:51pm]

From an anonymous author, a follow-up to the discussion about the cache etc.:

counterpoint 1: Itanium, which was EPIC like Elbrus, failed even with Intel behind it. And it added prefetching before the end. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itanium#Itanium_9500_(Poulson):_2012

counterpoint 2: To get fast, Elbrus has also added at least one kind of prefetch (APB, "Array Prefetch Buffer") and has the multimegabyte cache that Zaitcev decries. Source: [kozhin2016, 10.1109/EnT.2016.027]

counterpoint 3: "According to Keith Diefendorff, in 1978 almost 15 years ahead of Western superscalar processors, Elbrus implemented a two-issue out-of-order processor with register renaming and speculative execution" https://www.theregister.co.uk/1999/06/07/intel_uses_russia_military_technologies/

1. Itanium, as I recall, suffered from the poor initial implementation too much. Remember that 1st implementation was designed in Intel, while the 2nd implementation was designed at HP. Intel's chip stunk on ice. By the time HP came along, AMD64 became a thing, and then it was over.

Would Itanium win over the AMD64 if it were better established, burned less power, and were faster, sooner? There's no telling. The compatibility is an important consideration, and the binary translation was very shaky back then, unless you count Crusoe.

2. It's quite true that modern Elbrus runs with a large cache. That is because cache is obviously beneficial. All this is about is to consider once again if better software control of caches, and their better architecture in general, would disrupt side-channel signalling and bring performance advantages.

By the way, people might not remember it now, but a large chunk of Opteron's performance derived from its excellent memory controller. It's a component of CPU that tended not to get noticed, but it's essential. Fortunately, the Rowhammer vulnerability drew some much-needed attention to it, as well as a possible role for software control there.

3. Well, Prof. Babayan's own outlook at Elbrus-2 and its superscalar, out-of-order core was, "As you can see, I tried this first, and found that VLIW was better", which is why Elbrus-3 disposed with all that stuff. Naturally, all that stuff came back when we started to find the limits of EPIC (nee VLIW), just like the cache did.

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Police action in the drone-to-helicopter collision [05 Jan 2018|05:06pm]

The year 2017 was the first year when a civilian multicopter drone collided with a manned aircraft. It was expected for a while and there were several false starts. One thing is curious though - how did they find the operator of the drone? I presume it wasn't something simple like a post on Facebook with a video of the collision. They must've polled witnesses in the area, then looked at surveilance cameras or whatnot, to get it narrowed to vehicles.

UPDATE: Readers mkevac and veelmore inform that a serialized part of the drone was recovered, and the investigators worked through seller records to identify the buyer.

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Prof. Babayan's Revenge [05 Jan 2018|10:56am]

Someone at GNUsocial posted:

I suspect people trying to find alternate CPU architectures that don't suffer from #Spectre - like bugs have misunderstood how fundamental the problem is.Your CPU will not go fast without caches. Your CPU will not go fast without speculative execution. Solving the problem will require more silicon, not less. I don't think the market will accept the performance hit implied by simpler architectures. OS, compiler and VM (including the browser) workarounds are the way this will get mitigated.

CPUs will not go fast without caches and speculative execution, you say? Prof. Babayan may have something to say about that. Back when I worked under him in the 1990s, he considered caches a primitive workaround.

The work on Narch was informed by the observation that the submicron feature size provided designers with more silicon they knew what to do with. So, the task of a CPU designer was to identify ways to use massive amounts of gates productively. But instead, mediocre designers simply added more cache, even multi-level cache.

Talking about it was not enough, so he set out to design and implement his CPU, called "Narch" (later commercialized as "Elbrus-2000"). And he did. The performance was generally on par with its contemporaries, such as Pentium III and UltraSparc. It had a cache, but measured in kilobytes, not megabytes. But there were problems beyond the cache.

The second part of the Bee Yarn Knee's objection deals with the speculative execution. Knocking that out required a software known as a binary translator, which did basically the same thing, only in software[*]. Frankly at this point I cannot guarantee that it weren't possible to abuse that mechanism for unintentional signaling in the same ways Meltdown works. You don't have cache for timing signals in Narch, but you do have the translator, which can be timed if it runs at run time like in Transmeta Crusoe. In Narch's case it only ran ahead of time, so not exploitable, but the result turned out to be not fast enough for workloads that make a good use of speculative execution today (such as LISP and gcc).

Still, I think that a blanket objection that CPU cannot run fast with no cache and no speculative execution, IMHO, is informed by ignorance of alternatives. I cannot guarantee that E2k would solve the problem for good, after all its later models sit on top of a cache. But at least we have a hint.

[*] The translator grew from a language toolchain and could be used in creative ways to translate source. It would not be binary in such case. I omit a lot of detail here.

UPDATE: Oh, boy:

But the speedup from speculative execution IS from parallelism. We're just asking the CPU to find it instead of the compiler. So couldn't you move the smarts into the compiler?

Sean, this is literally what they said 30 years ago.

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